Hey, We're the Seer Green Team

A few of us like-minded individuals banded together to create an internal, non-sanctioned team of earth-loving Seer employees (AKA PlanetSeers) who are looking for ways to be more green—starting where we work.

This page is all about inspiration—sharing initiatives we’re testing and quick tips to help others find ways to go green!

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Turning Seer Green

We started with some smaller tactics:

  • Reusable K-Cup Filters are available on all floors
  • A Handful of Reusable Bags that team members can grab on the way to the supermarket, then bring back later or the next day
  • Plastic Bags Recycling: Dispensers that make it easy for the team to grab leftover plastic bags and drop them off at local supermarkets to recycle
  • Mug Lids to Minimize “To Go” Cups: Silicone lids are available on all floors. These will instantly turn cups and mugs into to-go cups and mugs! The team uses these on breaks to go get a coffee or other beverages.
  • Recycling Help: Charts near the bins on each floor, outlining what’s recyclable and what’s not
  • Composting: Floor 4 of the Philly office is equipped with composting and scheduled pickup
  • Aquaponics Center: Floor 4 FTW again—Sunflower microgreens, Pea Shoots, Wheatgrass, and Radish Sprouts are available for the team!
  • Quarterly Emails with green tips, new initiatives, and local events

Now, we’re moving on to pooling resources to provide every Seer team member with a reusable tote bag—and challenging them to use ZERO plastic bags.

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Quick Tips You Can Use

“No straw, please”

Those simple words save lives.

The #StopSucking campaign by StrawlessOcean.org reminds us we use 500 million plastic straws every day in the U.S. Many of those plastic straws end up in our oceans, polluting the water and harming sea life. If we don’t act now, by 2050, plastics in the ocean will outweigh the fish.

Check out how Buzzfeed got a whole office to go strawless.

 

Focus on Reuse

Start finding ways to cut out single-use items—plastic, paper, styrofoam, etc.

Carry a water bottle, bring your favorite to-go cup or mug to your local coffee shop, pack your lunch in tupperware instead of ziplocs, get some solid reusable bags for grocery shopping.

Start thinking about all the times you use something once, then throw it out. You’ll find plenty of opportunities to replace with a reusable solution.

 

Don’t hit the trash can with your gently used items. Just because we no longer use something doesn’t mean it’s not valuable to others.

Haven’t worn half your closet in a few years? Donate them to a local collection organization.

Finished with a book? Hand off to a library, friend, or coworker.

Upgraded your electronics? Lots of folks are in the market for refurbished tech.  Check out the manufacturer’s policy on accepting used items or hit up sites like freecycle.org.