SEER Blog

  • http://twitter.com/Darren_Moloney Darren Moloney

    Have to admit I thought I was clued up on e.g and i.e. – thought they were one and the same… thanks for clearing that up (it’ll give me something to think about at least)

    Mind you the interrobang never really took off: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interrobang

  • Doreen Dickens

    Thanks for the awesome tips. I have just hit the writer’s block and i need some motivation. Thanks for sharing. http://www.customwritingservice.org/

  • rocketmankev

    I must admit my grammar is terrible at times, you would love Proof reading my content with the constant squiggly red line.

  • Cori Shirk

    I probably would!

  • http://www.seerinteractive.com coris@seerinteractive.com

    The e.g. and i.e. thing is a really common one. Glad you found it helpful!

    And I do wish people used the interrobang more often. I think it’s the most epic punctuation mark ever.

  • http://twitter.com/AbeBellini Abe Bellini

    Thanks for the tips, Cori. I’m sure I make these mistakes often :)

  • mmstll

    As a fellow member of the grammar police force, one thing that helped me learn “e.g.” and “i.e.” was to think of it like this:

    “e.g.” = “egg sample”
    “i.e.”= “in essence”

    :)

  • http://www.kumailhemani.com/ Kumail Hemani

    Thanks for the tips Cori. This is general most of us make common mistakes that we think is correct as a writer but the readers feel that mistake. Proofreading is always the best!

  • http://www.facebook.com/michelle.m.obrien.1 Michelle Marsolais O’Brien

    You do one of your former English teachers proud, Cori! Well done! The “sickness” of loving grammar and editing is something from which I hope you never recover!

  • http://www.facebook.com/michelle.m.obrien.1 Michelle Marsolais O’Brien

    Great memory trick!

  • Cori Shirk

    Glad I could make you proud, Mrs. O’Brien :)

  • Cori Shirk

    Good one, I’ve never heard that before!

  • Cori Shirk

    I do wish people used the interrobang more often. It’s the most epic (and fun!) punctuation mark, in my opinion.

  • http://twitter.com/Wendy_Kirwan Wendy Kirwan

    I’m with you all the way, but sometimes I wonder if it really does matter anymore. I might know the difference between ‘less people’ (ouch!) and ‘fewer people,’ but it seems like no one else does, so who am I bothering to get it right for?!

  • Cori Shirk

    Ooh, less vs. fewer, I should have included that one. Never give up the good fight! It will always matter to someone :)

  • http://www.searchandmore.co.uk Jason Walker

    I’m constantly proof reading our copywriters articles ! I actually enjoy it in a geeky way!

  • http://twitter.com/NicoMiceli Nico Miceli

    This is great! I write like I talk in my head (as you and Emma know) which doesn’t always translate to proper grammar so I love these examples!

  • Cori Shirk

    Glad they’re helpful, Nico! I find myself constantly rewriting my thoughts to translate them into readable English, so you’re definitely not alone in that haha

  • Michael Gocia

    Thanks a lot for these useful tips , these really helps in writing articles and i used to make some mistakes these help me in rectifying those and present best content . I think submitting for proof reading helps me in getting good results.

  • Chris_LaRoche

    This is how I remember as well!

  • Chris_LaRoche

    I love this post! I notice you didn’t even touch commas. That would make for an entire blog post of its own.

  • adam 2290

    As a cotent writer, it can really grind my gears when people have no clue how to write. Lordie!

  • Mrs. Knutsen Hamilton

    Cori, I am so proud of you! Loved it.

  • Robert Sterner

    As another one of your former English teachers, your blog post deserves an “authority point!” http://mentalfloss.com/article/12710/13-little-known-punctuation-marks-we-should-be-using Quality work, Cori!

  • Erik Kielisch

    Yu meen riting is impportant to bee taken seryiously? Whoda thunk it? ;)