SEER Blog

  • http://www.facebook.com/juliette.hong.7 Julie Hong

    Hi Lana! Thank you for recommending and highlighting the qualities of Talkwalker Alerts. I love your writing style and your use of memes is very well mastered :) All the best to you!

  • Phil Laboon

    Ha love the memes. Maybe it’s just because I’m in the MTV ADHD generation but it really helps keeps my attention.

    My main problem with clients is they all don’t want to spend the time to actually create content with us than they complain about whatever we write… SEO problems…

  • http://twitter.com/JohnEVanBockern John E Van Bockern

    Lana, What do you suggest when you run into a client who is unwilling to open up? I have found other ways to do the necessary research, but i am curious if you have found any tricks to help coax a client into engaging more themselves.

  • http://www.digitalshiksha.com/ Sonu Pandey

    Hi, Lana thanks for the wonderful post on getting ideas for content generation, specially the hot topics alert through industry conferences. I also want to add Google suggest which is some help for content idea generation.

  • Lana Cooper

    Hi Sonu,

    Thank you so much for reading! And yes, I agree. Google Suggest is another great tool to use. *forehead slap* Wish I thought to put that one in here, as well. Maybe if there’s a Part 2. Thank you again!

  • Lana Cooper

    Hi John,
    Thanks for reading! You could try giving them a gentle nudge by presenting them with research you’ve done or something as simple as a news article you’ve stumbled upon in their sphere. You can present it formally or informally via email and say, “Hey! Thought you might find this interesting.” Getting something as simple as their reaction and approaching them in a friendly, albeit professional, way with a concern for their business may help them to open up to you just a little bit more. Good luck!

  • Lana Cooper

    Hi Phil,

    Glad you enjoyed the article! I’m from the same generation (when MTV played music! I know. I’m old!), so I’m glad the bits of humor sprinkled throughout helped make things interesting!

    Even if they complain about what you write, it’s a learning experience. Every client is different. On one hand, definitely be open to constructive criticism from the client. It’s very important for them to maintain brand integrity and as long as you can reflect that or get pointers from them as to how to keep that going with your content, it’s all good. I think everyone can benefit from a little constructive criticism.

    However, if you can also demonstrate that content you’ve done for the client (with respect to their brand, etc.) has performed well for them from an SEO standpoint, that might help to gently deflect some of the criticism. You’re not the enemy. You’re their ally in terms of helping them grow their business. Just make them understand you’re willing to work with them and want them to do well and (hopefully), it will all fall into place.

    Hope that helps!! Thanks again for reading!

  • Lana Cooper

    Thanks, Julie! I appreciate you taking the time to read and comment. Great service! :)

  • Phil Laboon

    THanks for the suggestion Lana, I think it really comes down to someone doing something that is really not their job and them not putting content writing high on the old priority list. If we have a dedicated person who’s job is to provide us content it’s not a problem. The problem comes when it wasn’t someone’s job in the first place.

    Thanks again!

  • http://www.brickmarketing.com/ Nick Stamoulis

    It’s always best to get topic ideas from the client directly, but this can be like pulling teeth sometimes. Reading other industry blogs and setting up Google Alerts for keywords is the next best way to know what people are talking about in the industry.